Reading With Them

I understand the importance of reading with my kids. They need to see me as a reader. We need to read together. Taking the time to read when my kids read during independent reading time is something that I LOVE doing, but I always feel guilty. Guilty that I’m not doing reading conferences. Guilty that I’m not helping them as readers. Guilty that I’m having so much run reading with them.

I guess that the reason that I’m writing this post is that I’d like to know how much my Nerdy Book Club community reads with their students during reading time. PLEASE leave me a comment and let me know how much and how often you read with you young readers.

Thanks!

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15 thoughts on “Reading With Them

  1. Ah, Colby, I struggle with that too. I’d say at the beginning of the year I spent more time reading while they did: to model it, to show that I was a reader. Now I spend a lot of time pulling small groups or conferencing.
    It’s hard to get past the guilt because it does feel so guilty: how can doing something that I enjoy so much be a good thing? Typing that, I realize how bizarre it sounds. For me, maybe a lot of that comes from the increased pressure I feel to always be engaged with my students.
    These are just my first, initial reactions. They’re not well thought out yet. You can see I’m still pondering the issue. Sorry.

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  2. I rarely read when my students do. It is the guilt of not conferencing. I do regularly discuss my reading life and goals. I display the. Overs of books I am reading to students.

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  3. I must admit I rarely read with them. I feel like I model being a reader by book talking books and sharing my reading life and try to use the time when the students are reading to conference or do small group instruction. I would love to be reading with them, but feel like I should not. I admit it is a dilemma.

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  4. I don’t read with my student’s a lot during reading time. I often think I should, but I selfishly decide to read on my own and stick with telling myself it’s okay because I’m modeling.

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  5. The first 20 minutes of every class (90 minute periods on A/B schedule) is for writing then reading. Students write in response to a prompt for at least 5 minutes then read. All English teachers do the same. No grading. No roll. Nothing but writing or reading so the kids see how important we think it is.

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  6. I probably do it more at the start of the year to model but not much after. I only have 55 mins for each class so the first 20 are a mini lesson and the other 35 I do conferences or small groups if needed.
    I do believe it is critically important that they know we are readers. I try and ensure my students know that through book talks of what I read the night before. Those are peppered into the week as much as possible.

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  7. I want to read while my students are reading so that we can read together as a class, but I find that other things always come up that prevent me from doing this. I might try to do this during the fourth quarter (now). I’ll at least give it a try!

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  8. My kids spend the first 45 min of every day reading books of their own choosing. At the beginning of the year, I spent the first 2 weeks reading alongside them. Anything I read became instantly cool. Kids were excited to recommend books to me. I think they also respected recommendations I would make for them because they knew I had read them myself (or at the very least heard about them on Twitter). I now fill my mornings with conferences and small groups. However, I do still make time for book trailers and recommendations. I’ll bring in books as I finish them and kids are really excited to hear about them and read them themselves. Someone on #titletalk recommended getting one of those digital picture frames and filling it with images of the covers of books I’ve read this year. That’s been on my to do list for a while. Happy reading, everyone! -Stephanie @cornellbigred3

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  9. I, like many of you, have felt guilty as I read along with my students. However, I have gotten past that! Most of my students come from generational poverty, and oftentimes, I am their only reading model. When I read with my students, they see me read the same things they are reading and then know my recommendations are legitimate. They see me cry, laugh, and hear me groan along with them when we have to stop reading to go to lunch. It has paid off in ways that cannot be measured!

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  10. I’m not a teacher yet, but I’ve always thought that reading while my students read would set a good example for them. However, when I think about some of the rigid principals I’ve worked with, I have a feeling several of them would have a conniption fit if they walked into my classroom and found me pleasure reading!

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  11. I do read children’s lit with my students during silent reading time sometimes. I love to do that. That way I can talk about what I’m reading and recommend books when I’m finished. I also love to laugh out loud at funny parts or react in other ways. I notice those reactions pique their interest about what I’m reading. Other times I do teacherly things when I need to. 😉 What I do try to avoid at all costs is just to grade or work on the computer during those SSR times even though it’s very tempting!

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  12. I used to feel guilty reading with my kids, but not any more. Most of my students come from generational poverty, so for many students, I am their only reading model. When students see me read the same books they are reading, see me cry, laugh, or hear me groan when it is time for lunch, my book recommendations become authentic. It has paid off in ways that cannot be measured (and ways that can)!

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  13. I don’t usually read with my students. I think it is important to share what you read and your reading life, but, like many, there are so few hours in the day and I need to use that time interacting with them. I do, however, write with them for 5ish minutes and share my writing. Bottom line, they need to see me as a reader and my excitement about books, but I don’t feel the need to sit and read with them.

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  14. I don’t read with my kids, but it’s for the same reason as you. I feel guilty. I have done it maybe two or three times this year. And I still don’t get to everyone in conferencing as much as I feel like I “should.” Geez, if only we had longer days! 🙂

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